Basic Mouthwatering Scone Recipe

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scones-smallBasic Mouthwatering Scone Recipe

I love my coffee, and when I go to a coffee house, like Starbucks or Caribou, I usually order a scone. But, to be honest, they are usually a little dryer than I like. So I decided to tweak a recipe and make scones at home. If I’d known how incredibly simple they are to make, I’d have done it much sooner.

This basic recipe is moist, yet still has the original scone texture and flavor.

Side note: The night I decided to make these scones, we were out of butter. We live in the country, about 15 minutes from town, so it’s rare that I’ll go into town for one item. I did drive to town for the butter. I wanted scones that bad. 

Some scone variations I love:

Cranberry Orange (pictured)

I like cranberries, so I add a full cup to the recipe, but 1/2 cup will do + grated skin of one small orange

Cranberry White Chocolate

1/2 cup dried cranberries

1/2 cup white chocolate chips

Chocolate Chip

1/2 to 1 cup of Nestles semi-sweet chocolate chips

Cinnamon Pecan

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1 Cup Pecans

Mocha

1 teaspoon espresso powder

1/2 to 1 cup of Nestles semi-sweet chocolate chips

 

Pumpkin

1/2 cup pumpkin puree

1 teaspoon Pumpkin Pie spice

The Basic Scone Recipe:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees

Prep: 10 minutes max, unless you’re messy like me.   Cook: 15-18 minutes (my oven cooks slow, so 18 for me)  Ready: 25-30 minutes (I can never wait, I eat them hot, right out of the oven)

If you have a mixer with a flat beater, this works best. I’m talking, “Whoa, that is mixed already?” best. I used a Kitchen Aide Mixer with the flat beater.

Ingredients:

3 C all-purpose flour

1/2 C granulated white sugar

5 T baking powder

1/2 t salt

3/4 C butter (this is 1.5 sticks of butter) cubed

1 Egg

1/2 C milk

1/2 C heavy cream

 

Crack egg into a measuring cup (no shells please), beat the egg like your life depends on it. Add mild and heavy cream and beat until well mixed.

In a large mixing bowl, add all of the dry ingredients: flour, sugar, baking powder and salt, mix on low speed for about 30 seconds. And I do mean LOW, unless you want flour all over your kitchen (we won’t go there)

Now, add in the butter, one cube at a time. This will cut the butter in, but you still have to mix on low speed (remember the flour warning).

Then add any extra ingredients such as cranberries or chocolate chips. Mmmmmmm

Add the milk, cream, egg mixture and continue to mix until you have a nice moist dough. This will take a mere few seconds.

 

Lightly flour a flat surface (or if you didn’t heed my warning earlier, you already have a floured surface), and take your dough from the mixing bowl and place it on the surface. It will be sticky and resemble bread dough. Knead the dough for about a minute or so, then cut the dough in half. If you have a large rolling surface, you can roll out the dough without dividing.

Depending on the size of your flat surface, you may have to cut dough into quarters. Roll the dough flat until about 1/2 an inch thick. Now take a knife and cut into wedges.

For a larger scone, you can cut about 8 wedges total. I prefer smaller scones, so I cut 16 wedges. I cut mine in a triangle shape, but you can also use a biscuit cutter and make round scones.

Lightly grease a large baking sheet (I use butter, so my scones have a nice slightly buttery taste) and place the scones about 1/2 inched from each other. Bake for 15-18 minutes, depending on your oven.

(You can cook longer, but your scones will be dry, and the bottoms will burn. The tops of the scones won’t get dark, unless you bake on the top rack, which I don’t recommend)

Optional: sprinkle with sugar before baking.

 

If you want perfect scones, you can use this pan instead. Divide your dough into 16 equal parts and smash into the pan slots.

If you don’t have a mixer, I highly recommend Kitchen Aide Mixers. You’ll find yourself using it for so much more than you thought a mixer could do.

If you make the scones, I’d love to hear what variation you made, and how they tasted. My husband doesn’t much like scones because he says they are not sweet. They aren’t really sweet, which makes them perfect.

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